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Spring 2017 Seminar Series

Schedule

Date Description Location
Thursday, February 23 ENVR Seminar: Gary Parker, University of Illinois

TBA

Toyota Auditorium, The Baker Center
Thursday, February 23 GEOTECH/STRUCT/MAT/CONSTR Seminar: Dr. Ravi Duddu, Vanderbilt University CEE Dept.

Abstract

Numerical approaches to modeling fracture can be classified into: sharp interface approaches (e.g., linear elastic fracture or cohesive zone models) or diffuse interface approaches (e.g., nonlocal continuum damage or phase field models). However, it has been well documented in the literature that the cohesive zone and phase field models can be recast into the framework of damage mechanics. In this talk, I will present two instances of the “damage mechanics approach” based on nonlocal gradient damage and cohesive zone models. First, I will describe an updated Lagrangian mixed finite element formulation for the creep (incompressible Stokes) flow driven fracture of glacier ice. I will discuss the model equations, numerical verification, and consistency of the formulation compared with the total Lagrangian viscoelastic finite element formulation through benchmark studies. I will then present idealized numerical studies that examine the conditions enabling crevasse (fracture) formation in Antarctic ice sheets and ice shelves. Second, I will describe discrete and continuum cohesive zone models for high-cycle fatigue delamination of composites based on the concept of additive decomposition of damage. I will discuss the model formulation within the finite element framework for different static fatigue damage functions and its calibration and validation through benchmark studies. I will then present parametric studies to examine the sensitivity of fatigue crack growth results to important model parameters. I will conclude with some remarks on nonlocal damage and phase field models and discuss future research directions.

 

Biography

Originally from India, Ravindra Duddu got his B. Tech in Civil Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras. He obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Northwestern University in 2006 and 2009, respectively. After that he worked as a postdoctoral research at the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (2009 – 2010) and Columbia University in the City of New York (2010 – 2012) before joining Vanderbilt University as an Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. His research interests are in the general area of computational solid mechanics with an emphasis on computational fracture mechanics and multi-physics modeling of material state identification and evolution. Specific application interests include: deformation and fracture of glacier ice and granular earth materials; environmentally assisted degradation of materials including corrosion, moisture and temperature enhanced damage in composites; finite strain deformation and wave propagation in soft solids and biological tissues.

405 John D. Tickle Building
Thursday, February 23 TRANSP Seminar: Leslie Meehan, TDOH

Abstract

Public health’s greatest accomplishments have focused on partnering with stakeholders to reshape our places and spaces to engineer and guide healthier, safer behaviors. This presentation will focus on the internal and external active transportation efforts of the Tennessee Department of Health to create conditions in the places where Tennesseans live, work, play, pray and learn which support positive health outcomes.

The presentation will describe the Tennessee Department of Health’s shift in prioritization from healthcare to primary prevention, focusing on physical activity through active transportation and built environment improvements as the foremost ways to improve population health.  The Department’s Primary Prevention Initiative involves 95% of the workforce participating in over 2,000 upstream prevention efforts involving many active transportation efforts such as master plans, bike share, law enforcement trainings and others. By providing paid time for all of the nearly 4,000 staff, no matter their role in the department, the Tennessee Department of Health is providing free expertise to the state and creating a true culture of health inside and outside the Department focused on primary prevention via physical activity from active transportation.

Finally, the presentation will cover the Tennessee Livability Collaborative, one of only four U.S. states using a Health in All Policies approach to state government.  The Collaborative was co-founded by the Tennessee Departments of Health, Transportation, Economic and Community Development and Education and now has more than 10 agency/department members with a mission of improving the prosperity, quality of life, and health of Tennesseans through state department collaboration in the areas of policy, funding, and programming. The vision is a high quality of life for all Tennesseans that includes opportunities for education, employment, health, active transportation, healthy foods, housing, recreation and culture in Tennessee communities with the goal of advancing the economic competitiveness by enhancing the livability of Tennessee communities.

Bio

Leslie Meehan, MPA AICP oversees the Office of Primary Prevention in the Commissioner’s Office of the Tennessee Department of Health.  Her focus is increasing physical activity through the built environment as the foremost way to combat the state’s largest health issues.  Previously, Ms. Meehan served ten years as the Director of Healthy Communities for the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Tennessee. At the MPO, she focused on the intersection of transportation and health, specifically transportation’s impacts on physical activity, air quality and injury.  Her work has been recognized nationally and internationally.

Ms. Meehan is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners, the Institute of Transportation Engineers, the Association of Bicycle and Pedestrian Professionals and the Tennessee Public Health Association.  She is co-author of the Transportation Sector of the National Physical Activity Plan, served as expert advisor on the U.S. Department of Transportation and CDC Transportation and Health Tool, was appointed by Transportation Secretary Peters to the National Safe Routes to School Task Force and has presented at a White House event on Transportation and Health. She currently serves as a panel member on the National Academies: National Cooperative Highway Research Program’s Research Roadmap for Transportation and Health and is a member of the National Academies – Transportation Research Board Taskforce on Arterials and Public Health.

327 John D. Tickle Building
Thursday, March 2 ENVR Seminar: Bahal Mahalder, Graduate Student, CEE

Student TBA

109 Estabrook
Thursday, March 9 ENVR Seminar: Jessica Thompson, CEE Graduate Student
109 Estabrook
Thursday, March 23 ENVR Seminar: Jian Sun, CEE Graduate Student

TBA

109 Estabrook
Thursday, March 30 ENVR Seminar: TBA

TBA

109 Estabrook
Thursday, March 30 GEOTECH/STRUCT/MAT/CONSTR Seminar: Brian Thomas

TBA

405 John D. Tickle Building
Thursday, April 13 ENVR Seminar: Jennifer DeBruyn, BESS (focus: Environmental Microbiology), UTK

TBA

109 Estabrook
Thursday, April 20 ENVR Seminar: Lisa Reyes Mason, College of Social Work, UTK

TBA

109 Estabrook
Thursday, April 27 ENVR Seminar: Curt Jawdy, TVA

TBA

109 Estabrook

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